Wellness

  “The expectation that we can be immersed in suffering and loss daily and not be touched by it is as unrealistic as expecting to be able to walk through water without getting wet.” – Rachel Naomi Remen, MD Our primary role as frontline professionals is to meet the needs of those we serve. This can be a...
 

“The expectation that we can be immersed in suffering and loss daily and not be touched by it is as unrealistic as expecting to be able to walk through water without getting wet.”
– Rachel Naomi Remen, MD

Our primary role as frontline professionals is to meet the needs of those we serve. This can be a deeply rewarding experience, and the daily contact with our colleagues and students, patients, clients, or community members is what keeps many of us going. At times, however, the rewards of our work come with challenges including direct or indirect exposure to trauma and tragedy; increasingly stressful or cynical work environments; heavy caseloads; dwindling resources; and ridicule or even disdain from some members of society. These challenges leave us vulnerable to secondary traumatic stress, vicarious trauma, compassion fatigue and burnout.


→ Adapted from compassionfatigue.org
 

Self-care is the cornerstone for combatting compassion fatigue, vicarious trauma, secondary traumatic stress and burnout.

Frontline Psychological Services & Wellness is pleased to offer wellness events to support and revitalize America’s frontline professionals.

Wellness events help frontline workers be at their best on and off the job.

Events may take the form of retreats or workshops and can be as short as half a day or as long as one week. The events may occur on a one-time basis or repeat monthly, quarterly or at another agreed upon rate.

Programming is personalized to your workforce. Activities may include sensory-based interventions, meditation, mindfulness + mindlessness, virtual reality, yoga, qigong, bibliotherapy, journaling, hiking, photography, animal assisted- and art therapy, aromatherapy, acupressure, trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy (TF-CBT) or dialectal behavior therapy (DBT).